Éilís Ní Dhuibhne

Publications

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 July 2011 22:15 Written by Administrator Thursday, 07 July 2011 22:05

Publications by Éilís Ní Dhuibhne Listed by Genre, 1974–2008  

Novels in English

The Bray House (Dublin: Attic Press, 1990)

 Singles (Dublin: Basement [Attic] Press, 1994)

 The Dancers Dancing (Belfast: Blackstaff Press, 1999/2000/2007; Hodder Review 2000 )

 Fox, Swallow, Scarecrow (Belfast: Blackstaff Press, 2007)  

Novels in Irish

Dúnmharú sa Daingean (Baile Átha Cliath: Cois Life, 2000)

 Cailíní Beaga Ghleann na mBláth (Baile Átha Cliath: Cois Life, 2003)

 Dún an Airgid (Baile Átha Cliath: Cois Life, 2008)  

Short Story Collections

Blood and Water (Dublin: Attic Press, 1988)

Eating Women Is Not Recommended (Dublin: Attic Press, 1991)

‘The Inland Ice’ and Other Stories (Belfast: Blackstaff Press, 1997)

 The Pale Gold of Alaska and Other Stories (Belfast: Blackstaff Press, 2000; Hodder Review 2000)

 Midwife to the Fairies: New and Selected Stories (Cork: Attic Press, 2003)  

Short Stories in English

‘Green Fuse’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, February 1974 (published under the pseudonym Elizabeth Dean). Reprinted in The Irish Eros, ed David Marcus, 1996.‘The Duck-billed Platypus’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1975 (pseud. Elizabeth Dean).‘A Fairer House’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1976 (pseud. Elizabeth Dean).‘Prepare a  Face’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1978 (pseud. Elizabeth Dean).‘The Postmen’s Strike’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1979 (pseud. Elizabeth Dean).‘Looking’, Sunday Independent, 1981.‘The Catechism Examination’ Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1982; Paris Transcontinental, 1991.‘Blood and Water’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1983. Reprinted in The Blackstaff Book of Short Stories, 1988 ‘A Visit to Newgrange’, Irish Times, 1985.‘Fulfilment’, Panurge Magazine, 1986. (reprinted in Best Short Stories 1986. ed Giles Gordon, London, Heineman, 1986)‘Eating Women Is Not Recommended’, Irish Times, 1989.‘The Garden of Eden’, Irish Times, 1990.‘The Makers’, in  The Phoenix Book of Irish Short Stories. Ed. David Marcus.     London: Phoenix, 1998;‘The Master Key’, in Ladies Night at Finbar's Hotel. Ed. Dermot Bolger. Dublin:              New Island Books/London, Picador, 1999.‘The Moon Shines Clear, the Horseman’s  Near’ in  Phoenix Book of Irish Short Stories. Ed. David Marcus. London, 2002 ;It is a Miracle,’ in Arrows in Flight: Irish short stories. Ed. Caroline Walsh,       Dublin/New York: Townhouse, 2002.‘Evelina’, first broadcast BBC Radio 4, 2004.‘A  Literary Lunch’, in  Faber Book of Irish Short Stories 2006. ed David Marcus, London, Faber, 2006. ‘The Strange Case of the Scream in the Night’, first broadcast BBC Radio 4 2008.‘Right of Passage’, Amnesty Series, Irish Times, July 2008.  [ALAN – 

Stories from collections also  anthologized in:Territories of the Voice. Ed Louise De Salvo. London: Virago,    1990.Cosmopolis.  Ed. Inez Rieder. San Francisco: Kleis Press, 1990.State of the Art.  Ed. David Marcus. London: Sceptre, 1992Virgins and Hyacinth.  Ed Caroline Walsh. Dublin: Attic, 1993.The Picador Book of Irish Fiction.  Ed. Dermot Bolger.     London: Picador, 1993.Best Short Stories 1986.  Ed. Giles Gordon, London,     Heinemann, 1986.Blackstaff Book of Short Stories.  Belfast: Blackstaff, 1988.Second Blackstaff Book of Short Stories. Belfast: Blackstaff,          1991.Wildish Things.  Ed. Ailbhe Smyth, Dublin: Attic, 1989.Ireland's Women; Writings Past and Present.  Ed, Katie Donovan, Dublin, Gill and Macmillan, 1994.Irish Comic Writing. Ed Ferdia MacCana.  London: Michael      Joseph, 1995.Frauen in Irland.  Munich: DTV, 1990.Antologia della nuova Letteratura Irlandaise. Perugia, 1994. Move Over Waxblinder. Ed. John Murray. Brampton,   England: Panurge, 1994.The Irish Eros. Ed. David Marcus. Dublin: Gill, 1996.A Part of Ourselves. Ed. Siobhan Parkinson. Dublin: Farmar,             1997.Oxford Book of Ireland. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1998.Kri in Voda. Antologija sodobnih irskih kratkih zgodb.  Ed.             Tina Kahkota. Ljubljana, Slovenia, 1998.  

Short Stories in Irish

‘Luachra’ in Cathal Póirtéir, ed. Scéalta san Aer (Baile Átha Cliath: Coiscéim, 2000: 96–102) 

Children’s Books

The Uncommon Cormorant (Dublin: Poolbeg, 1990)

Hugo and the Sunshine Girl (Dublin: Poolbeg, 1991)

The Hiring Fair (Dublin: Poolbeg, 1993)

 Blaeberry Sunday (Dublin: Poolbeg, 1994)

Penny Farthing Sally (Dublin: Poolbeg, 1996)

 The Sparkling Rain (Dublin: Poolbeg, 2003)

 Hurlamaboc (Baile Átha Cliath: Cois Life, 2006)

Úpraid (Glasgow: Úr Sgeul, 2006) – Scots Gaelic version of Hurlamaboc. 

 

Plays

Dún na mBan Trí Thine was produced by Amharclann de Hide and first performed at the Peacock, Dublin, 1995

 Milseog an tSamhraidh was produced by Amharclann de Hide and first performed at the Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College, in 1996 (Published as Milseog an tSamhraidh agus Dún na mBan Trí Thine (Baile Átha Cliath: Cois Life, 1998) 

The Wild SwansProduced by the Abbey and performed at the Peacock Theatre, Dublin, in 1998  

Radio Plays

Casadh an Tape Recorder. RTÉ Radio 1 drama first broadcast on 17 October 2003.Bábóga, Raidio na Gaeltachta, first broadcast autumn 2008. 

 

Stories in journals and newspapers

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 July 2011 21:52 Written by Administrator Saturday, 05 September 2009 19:03

Short Stories in English

‘Green Fuse’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, February 1974 (published under the pseudonym Elizabeth Dean). Reprinted in The Irish Eros, ed David Marcus, 1996.

‘The Duck-billed Platypus’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1975 (pseud. Elizabeth Dean).

‘A Fairer House’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1976 (pseud. Elizabeth Dean).

‘Prepare a  Face’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1978 (pseud. Elizabeth Dean).

‘The Postmen’s Strike’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1979 (pseud. Elizabeth Dean).

‘Looking’, Sunday Independent, 1981

.‘The Catechism Examination’ Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1982; Paris Transcontinental, 1991.

‘Blood and Water’, Irish Press, New Irish Writing, 1983. Reprinted in The Blackstaff Book of Short Stories, 1988 

‘A Visit to Newgrange’, Irish Times, 1985.

‘Fulfilment’, Panurge Magazine, 1986. (reprinted in Best Short Stories 1986. ed Giles Gordon, London, Heineman, 1986)

‘Eating Women Is Not Recommended’, Irish Times, 1989.

‘The Garden of Eden’, Irish Times, 1990.

‘The Makers’, in  The Phoenix Book of Irish Short Stories. Ed. David Marcus.     London: Phoenix, 1998;

‘The Master Key’, in Ladies Night at Finbar's Hotel. Ed. Dermot Bolger. Dublin:              New Island Books/London, Picador, 1999.

‘The Moon Shines Clear, the Horseman’s  Near’ in  Phoenix Book of Irish Short Stories. Ed. David Marcus. London, 2002 ;

It is a Miracle,’ in Arrows in Flight: Irish short stories. Ed. Caroline Walsh,       Dublin/New York: Townhouse, 2002.

‘Evelina’, first broadcast BBC Radio 4, 2004

.‘A  Literary Lunch’, in  Faber Book of Irish Short Stories 2006. ed David Marcus, London, Faber, 2006.

 ‘The Strange Case of the Scream in the Night’, first broadcast BBC Radio 4 2008.

‘Right of Passage’, Amnesty Series, Irish Times, July 2008. 

  

 

Stories from collections also  anthologized in:

Territories of the Voice. Ed Louise De Salvo. London: Virago,       1990.

Cosmopolis.  Ed. Inez Rieder. San Francisco: Kleis Press, 1990

State of the Art.  Ed. David Marcus. London: Sceptre, 1992

Virgins and Hyacinths.  Ed Caroline Walsh. Dublin: Attic, 1993.

The Picador Book of Irish Fiction.  Ed. Dermot Bolger. London: Picador, 1993.

Best Short Stories 1986.  Ed. Giles Gordon, London, Heinemann, 1986.

Blackstaff Book of Short Stories.  Belfast: Blackstaff, 1988.

Second Blackstaff Book of Short Stories. Belfast: Blackstaff, 1991.

Wildish Things.  Ed. Ailbhe Smyth, Dublin: Attic, 1989.

Ireland's Women; Writings Past and Present.  Ed, Katie Donovan, Dublin, Gill and Macmillan, 1994.

Irish Comic Writing. Ed Ferdia MacCana.  London: Michael       Joseph, 1995.

Frauen in Irland.  Munich: DTV, 1990.Antologia della nuova Letteratura Irlandaise. Perugia, 1994.

 Move Over Waxblinder. Ed. John Murray. Brampton, England: Panurge, 1994.

The Irish Eros. Ed. David Marcus. Dublin: Gill, 1996.

A Part of Ourselves. Ed. Siobhan Parkinson. Dublin: Farmar,     1997.

Oxford Book of Ireland. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1998.

Kri in Voda. Antologija sodobnih irskih kratkih zgodb.  Ed. Tina Kahkota. Ljubljana, Slovenia, 1998.

 

 

 

  

 

Non-fiction

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 July 2011 21:52 Written by Administrator Saturday, 05 September 2009 18:44

Non-Fiction

 

 

ARTICLES ON VARIOUS TOPICS

 ‘Prayers of the Faithful’. Irish Times, 7 July 2007.“Saibhreas nó Daibhreas? An Scríbhneoir Dátheangach” in Aisling Ní Dhonnchadha, ed. An Prós Comhaimseartha. Léachtaí Cholm Cille XXXVI. (Maigh Nuad: An Sagart, 2006: 139–154).‘Learning Language Without Words’. Irish Times, 5 Aug. 2005.‘Why Would Anyone Write in Irish?’ in Ciarán Mac Murchaidh, ed., ‘Who Needs Irish?’: Reflections on the Importance of the Irish Language Today (Dublin: Veritas Publications, 2004).

‘Family Values: The Sheehy Skeffington Papers in the National Library of Ireland’. History Ireland, (Spring 2000).

‘The Irish’, In Ake Daun and Soren Jansson, edd. Europeans. Essays on Culture and Identity. Lund, Nordic Academic Press, 1999: 47-65.‘Reader, I married Him’, in From Newman to New Woman. UCD Women Remember. Ed Anne Macdona,  Dublin, New Island, 2001: 175-79.‘Narrative Techniques in The Mai’, in The Theatre of Marina Carr, edd. Cathy Leeney and Anna McMullan, Dublin, Carysfort Press, 2003: 65-74.

‘Transcending Genre: Sebastian Barry’s Juvenile Fiction’, in Out of History: Essays on the Writings of Sebastian Barry. Ed. Christina Hunt Mahony,  Dublin, Carysfort Press, 2006: 25-36.

 

 

BOOKS

 

  Voices on the Wind: Women Poets of the Celtic Twilight (Dublin: New Island Books, 1995). 

WB Yeats, Works and Days. Ed, with James Quin and Ciara McDonnell. Dublin, National Library, 2006.

 

ARTICLES ON FOLKLORE TOPICS

 

‘The Brave Tailor’. Sinsear, the Folklore Journal, (1980): 84–91.‘Ex Corde: At 1186 in Irish tradition’. Béaloideas, (1980): 86–134.‘Old English Metre and Children’s Street Rhymes’. Sinsear, the Folklore Journal, (1982): 76–82.Dublin Modern Legends: An Intermediate Type-List’. Béaloideas, (1983): 55–69.‘”The Land of Cokaygne”’: A Middle English Source for Irish Food Historians’. Ulster Folklife, (1988).‘”The Loving Wife”: Synge’s Use of Popular Material in The Shadow of the Glen’. Béaloideas, (1990): 141–180‘Legends of the Supernatural in Anglo-Irish Literature’. Béaloideas, 60–1. No. 1992–3 (1992): 145–150. ‘The Old Woman as Hare: Structure and Meaning in an Irish Legend’. Folklore, Vol. 104 (1993).‘The Irish’ in Åke Daun and Sören Jansson, eds. Europeans: Essays on Culture and Identity (Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 1999: 47–66).‘The Cow that Ate the Pedlar in Kerry and Wyoming’. Béaloideas, (1999), 125–134.Introduction to Séamas Ó Catháin, ed., Northern Lights, Following Folklore in North-Western Europe, Essays in Honour of Bo Almqvist (Dublin: University College Dublin Press, 2001).‘Fer in the North Contree: With His Whole Heart Revisited’ in Séamas Ó Catháin, ed, Northern Lights (Dublin: University College Dublin Press, 2001: 202–214).Translator of ‘The Story of the Little White Goat’ as told by Máire Ruiséal, Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing, Volume IV: Irish Women’s Writing and Traditions. (New York: New York University Press, 2002), 1219–1232. ‘Women and Irish Narrative Tradition’. Supplement to the Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing: Volumes IV and V (Cork: Cork University Press, 2002).

‘”They made me tea and gave me a lift home”: Urban Folklore Collecting 1979–1980’. Béaloideas, (2006), 63–84.

 BOOKS ON FOLKLORE TOPICS With Séamas Ó Cátháin, eds., Viking Ale, Studies on Folklore Contacts between the Northern and Western Worlds (presented to Bo Almqvist on the occasion of his 60th birthday) (Aberystwyth: Boethius Press, 1991).  
   

Critical Commentaries

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 July 2011 21:50 Written by Administrator Saturday, 05 September 2009 15:23

 

Rebecca Pelan, ed, Éilis Ní Dhuibhne: Perspectives (Galway, Arlen House, 2009).

ISBN 978-1-903631-48-5 (paperback)

ISBN 978-1-903631-97-3 (hardback)

This book is a collection of critical essays about various aspects of Éilís Ní Dhuibhne’s writing. The contributors are Christine St. Peter, Giovanna Tallone, Anne Fogarty, Caitriona Moloney, Sarah O’Connor, Mary Shine Thompson, Anne Markey, Brian Ó Conchubhair, Pádraig Ó Siadhail, Jacqueline Fulmer, Helena Wulff, and Anne O’Connor. An excellent introduction by the editor of the volume, Rebecca Pelan, is also included.

This book may be acquired from any good bookshop, from Amazon books, or directly from the publisher:

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(www.arlenhouse.ie)

In the United States, it is distributed by Syracuse Press – This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

(www.syracuseuniversitypress.syr.edu)

 

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Selection of Articles and essays:

Jacqueline Fulmer, Folk Women and Indirection in the Work of Morrison, Hurston, Ni Dhuibhne, and Lavin. (Ashgate, 2007);

 

Christine St Peter, Changing Ireland. Strategies in Contemporary Women’s Fiction. New York Palgrave 2000

 

Derek Hand, “Being Ordinary. Ireland from Elsewhere. A reading of Eilis Ni Dhuibhne’s The Bray House”  103-116.  Irish University Review Spring 2000

 

Anne Fogarty,introduction to Midwife to the Fairies (Cork,Attic, 2000)

 

Field Day anthology of Irish Writing, Volumes IV and V

 

Carol Morris,   ‘The Bray House, an Irish critical Utopia’.  Etudes Irlandaises, 1996, pp 127-40.

 

Christina Hunt Mahony, Contemporary Irish Literature. Transforming Fiction.London, Macmillan, 1998.

 

Jerry White, “Multi-lingualism and Exile in recent Irish-language drama” Journal of Canadian Association for Irish Studies, 2005

 

Donna Perry, “Eilis Ni Dhuibhne”  Backtalk. Women writers speak out. New Brunswick. Rutgers University Press, 1993, 245-60.

 

 

Declan Kiberd, introduction to The Dancers Dancing (Blackstaff, 2007 edition)  

Christine St Peter, “Crossing Borders without “proper maps”. Anne Enright, Colm Toibin and Eilis Ni Dhuibhne attempt the art of cartography.  Spanish Association of Irish Studies conference, May 2005

 

Giovanna Tallone, “The Dynamnic of Global issues and space in Eilis Ni Dhuibhne’s The Bray House”  Iasil Conference, Prague 2005-05-30

 

Giovanna Tallone,  “Past present and future.Patterns of Otherness in Eilis Ni Dhuibhne’s fiction”.  Galway, 2004

 

Other references may be found in Google Scholar.

 

Reviews

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 July 2011 21:51 Written by Administrator Saturday, 05 September 2009 13:23

SOME REVIEWS OF LATEST WORKS 

 

FOX SWALLOW SCARECROW is a comic novel set in contemporary Dublin. Using as its model Anna Karenina, it takes a satirical look at the Irish literary scene during the affluent first decade of the 21st century, focusing on the story of a writer of children’s fiction: Anna Kelly Sweeney.

Extracts from reviews of

FOX SWALLOW SCARECROW (2007)

From The Irish Times, 10 November 2007

(Bernard O’Donoghue)

In Eilis Ni Dhuibhne’s new novel, her familiar strengths are well in evidence: the linguistic precision conveying the social observations of her cool eye, and the unsettling way compassion emerges from behind the satirical edge. The opening chapters manifest a sweeping breeziness about the new Ireland that make you think of Flann O’Brien....Ni Dhuibhne’s pre-eminent technical gift – to evoke a character or mood unmistakably in three words – is dazzling. It is what enables her to develop this book from a social satire about literary Dublin into a serious, angry novel which is an emotional roller coaster...An Irish woman novelist has just won the Man Booker Prize; there is a very credible candidate here to etain the title.

 

From

The Sunday Tribune( 7 October 2007)

(Katrina Goldstone)

Confronted with a proof copy of Fox, Swallow, Scarecrow and unable to find the press blurb, I started to read it completely unaware of its literary genre. After a while the phrase ‘aboveaveragechicklit’ floated across my brain. Fine. Not exactly my cup of tea but this was a superior example of it, there were attempts at social critique, musings on 21st century Irish society, not terribly deep but what do you want from chicklit?...

But by the time the novel closes with several melodramatic events and a clever-clever final twist in the tail, a cack-handed reversal of the Anna Karenina ending, it’s hard not to wish that all the characters would fall under a tram. At least that would put them ... and us ... out of their misery.’

 

and also from

The Sunday Tribune (11 November 2007)

(Tom Widger)

A poke at literary publicity in 21st century Dublin is wonderfully packed with satirical potential and Ni Dhuibhne holds it up to savage scrutiny; she truly puts the ‘ire’ into satire.

 

From

The Times Literary Supplement, December 2007

(Patricia Craig)

It’s a very good novel.

 

From The Irish Independent, 6th October 2007

(Brian Lynch)

Fox Swallow Scarecrow is a novel of contemporary manners. It describes a burgeoning subset of the native population: Secondary Arts Persons. To be a SAP you need to have a job in an arts-related body or in publishing, to be almost a writer (with an agent) and to spend your leisure time going to book launches... Cultural historians of the future will regard Fox Swallow Scarecrow as a goldmine of information about Celtic Tiger Ireland... Present day readers will find it an astute and acute novel.

 

From Dublin Confessions

(Aideen Fitzpatrick)

 

A modern Irish take on Anna Karenina seems a major undertaking and comes with the possibility of spectacular failure. Eilis Ni Dhuibhne does a beautiful job...What we have here is an intricate portrait of elitist Dublin society, written with both grace and precision.

 

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Dún an Airgid (Cois Life 2008)

Dún an Airgid is a mystery novel, a whodunit. Set in an invented town, Dún an Airgid, a Utopian experiment, it takes an affectionate but satirical look at modern Irish life and mores, while exploring the adventures of Saoirse, the optimistic artist from South Dublin, and her partner, an Sáirsint Máirtín Ó Flaithearta, the stoical policeman from South Munster. A sequel to the prize winning best seller, Dúmharú sa Daingean, Dún an Airgid has also won an Oireachtas prize for light fiction.

 

From

Irish Times, 15 November 2008

(Micheál O Croinín)

A published author in both English and Irish, Éilís Ní Dhuibhne has already ventured into detective fiction with Dunmharú sa Daingean (2000) in which Saoirse makes her first appearance. The tale in Dún an Airgid is briskly told in a style that is eminently accessible to young adult or adult learners of Irish. Connoisseurs of the whodunit may feel that more needed to be said about the circumstances of the murders and that some plot lines (the sale of artworks, for example) needed more development but Ní Dhuibhne excels in the art of persuasive storytelling. As an account of what goes wrong when the Celtic Cockaigne turns dark, it is very much a tale for our times.

 

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SOME COMMENTS ON EARLIER WORKS

 

Blood and Water

 

 “Here is a heightened world of sensual observation, delivered in a calm and credible tone, the voice of the storyteller being capable of attaining marvellous heights, never faltering through fear of the dark beneath the surface of these stories. The accuracy with which the surface is delineated allows the reader to probe with confidence the complications, both personal and political, that motivate these characters, for Ni Dhuibhne’s subject is contemporary Ireland, and that is a dark, complicated place.   The strength of the collection lies in its humour…” (Frank McGuinness, Irish Literary Supplement, Fall 1990) 

 

 “Perhaps it needs a certain zaniness to express the situation of women in Ireland at the moment, and the less outwardly realistic Eilis Ni Dhuibhne stories are, the more real seems their sense of increasingly unquiet desperation… In these stories there is a voice that is all Eilis Ni Dhuibhne’sown, one that is well worth listening to.”(Fintan O’Toole, Sunday Tribune, May 1990.) “Two stories by Eilis Ni Dhuibhne are eerie and impeccably constructed”(Hilary Mantel, Telegraph, 29.10. 1995Review of The Blackstaff Book of Short Stories.) 

 

The Pale Gold of Alaska

 

 ‘Eilis Ni Dhuibhne’s The Pale Gold of Alaska and other Stories is proof, if proof were needed, that the Irish short story is on the crest of an exciting new wave. Stories like “The Day Elvis Presley died show her mastery of the genre. Whether it’s the tale of an emigrant Irish girl in love with a Blackfoot Indian in the wilds of Montana or a mother on a Kerry beach convinced her son has drowned, there is in these stories the rare perfection of completeness.”(Caroline Walsh, Irish Times, 9 December 2000.) 

“The shortlisting of Eilis Ni Dhuibhne’s novel The Dancers Dancing for this year’s Orange Prize brought international recognition to an author who, over the past twelve years, has quietly published a sizeable body of writing in Ireland. While her earlier novel, The Bray House, received attention for its singular eco-critical and futuristic aspects, she has worked most consistently and successfully with short fiction. The Pale Gold of Alaska is her fourth volume of stories, and it continues, though with more stylistic calculation, her favoured demotic examination of commonplace lives and especially loves.”(John Kenny, Times Literary Supplement. 20 October 2000.) 

Eilis Ni Dhuibhne is the most gifted young Irish writer. In The Pale Gold of Alaska her prose shimmers like poetry.(Edna O Brien, The Observer, 26 November 2000.) 

“Beautifully written and full of humour, these are stories whose insights are never forced. The author’s last novel, The Dancers Dancing, has been shortlisted for this year’s Orange Prize, and on the strength of these stories it is not hard to see why.”(Christina Konig, The Times, Oct 18, 2000.) 

 

The Dancers Dancing

 “This novel, like other recent irish writing, turns west to explore sexual and Irish identities. But rather than being a search for essential origins, Ni Dhuibhne’s narrative reveals the contingency of a historical moment. Language and landscape are layered but thye cannot fix what is preserved, only muddy it. As the narrator puts it, “you dig and dig and sometimes you do not recognize what you find…  Orla too momentarily encounters a poetic otherworld romanticism, inevitably of a dark and savage, rather than a sentimental, tone. She recognizes that a trace of the unspeakable past is part of her personal history, but the fleeting knowledge is a narrative remnant to an ending that repudiates false cohesions. Ni Dhuibhne’s writing is marvellous, building layers of impression until a complex, vital and true-false picture of liberation is revealed.(Kathy Cremin, Irish Times,  7 August 1999). 

‘Ni Dhuibhne once again displays her great gift for observing social nuances, and commenting obliquely but sardonically on the power structures which underwrite them. She also has a wonderful empathy for the manifold confusions and insecurities of early adolescence. .. when is the world going to discover Eilis Ni Dhuibhne?(Des Traynor, Books Ireland October 1999).  

 


 

 

 

   

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